Kalabsha Temple Aswan Ancient Talmis Mandulis Nubian god Temple

Kalabsha Temple is one of the series of Temples that were relocated during the construction of the Aswan Dam by the UNESCO in 1970, now is only accessible by boat in an Island known by New Kalabsha south of Aswan.

Kalabsha

An ancient Temple known in ancient Talmis times, was founded around 1450 B.C. by Pharaoh Amenhotep II son of Pharaoh Thotmes III the seventh pharaoh of the Eightieth Dynasty during the “New Egyptian Empire” epoch whose pharaohs expanded their Empire to this region.

Although this Temple was later rebuilt by the Romans, about 20 BC when Agustus Ruled Rome. Although, the building stylishness is a classical Egyptian style, has a strong influence from the Ptolemaic period, as it is located, farther than the First Cataract, it is considered a Nubian Temple.

Although this Temple was later rebuilt by the Romans, about 20 BC when Agustus Ruled Rome. Although, the building stylishness is a classical Egyptian style, has a strong influence from the Ptolemaic period, as it is located, farther than the First Cataract, it is considered a Nubian Temple.

Certainly that on the point of its Temple complex dimensions, is considered one of the biggest Sacred Complex that belong to the Nubian-Egyptian time that has been conserved in very good-standard conditions; therefore, as well it is, one of the greatest achievement done concerning in relation to the works of reconstruction done, when the Nasser Lake was under construction. Kalabsha was a temple consecrated to Fertility deities, its outstanding God was Mandulis (Marul in its original language) a Nubian Solar god of similar attributes as the Egypt god Heru or the Greek god Apollo, as well, a Solar Divine supernatural creature of the their Mythological Cosmogony.

Kalabsha Temple

God Mandulis was included with a high gods-standard qualifications into the Egyptian regional, religious system, as well this God also was related to Gods Isis an Osiris, therefore, also was represented in similar form than the Egyptian gods, which at God Mandulis times was represented as a person with Ram-horns and ostrich feathers on top, some other times, as a young-man or as an old man, keeping the same Egyptian gods theological concepts.

The influence of this god in the area apparently lasted only under the Roman influence. In the walls of this temple can be seen also a large number of Egyptian deities representations, like gods Min, Khnum, Isis, Thoth showing the same ritual allegories than the ancient Egyptian beliefs and myths, as well, are present, the Executions representations of their enemies, which is a common theme in most of the Egyptian Ancient Temples, as well, there are rooms with Niches or False doors and windows, done, with the purpose, to set worshiping items sane as the Egyptians had, which shows full integration of the Nubian Egyptians beliefs at the Time.

Kalabsha wall decoration

At the left side of the entrance door of this Temple, is a small Chapel, consecrated to the Egyptian Goddess Hathor, this Shrine is facing the lake, which gives a breathtaking view, this Chapel also has the traditional columns ornamentation, used in relation to this goddess, consisting in in columns ornamented with four-faced goddess Hathor statues wearing a Mastaba likes headdress which are pointing in the direction of the four Cardinal points on top of columns as a goddess-crown, definitively another significant factor that shows that the Egyptian and Nubian gods were depicted in entirely similar way like was done in Egyptian Temples.

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Kalabsha temple Egypt egyptian goddesss Isis Nubian god Mandulis
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